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Senate Republicans Backpedal On Impeachment After More Evidence Emerges

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Senate Republicans Backpedal On Impeachment After More Evidence Emerges

After vowing to “quickly quash” any articles of impeachment passed by the House, Senate Republicans are now backpedaling as damaging revelations against President Donald Trump mount and the possibility of a dismissal of the charges shrinks.

Senate Republicans initially dismissed the release of the transcript of the July 25 phone call between Trump and Zelensky as a nothing burger.

But as the Democrats compile more evidence that Trump withheld military assistance from Ukraine to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, they are adopting a more sober tone.

Sen. Tim Scott (S.C.) was the latest GOP senator to express concerns Wednesday even though he argued that the House has yet to provide any evidence that would support actually removing Trump from office.

“Everybody wants us to do the right thing. In order to do the right thing, we want to see all that there is,” Scott told reporters, explaining that he’s not ready to dismiss the House charges out of hand.

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) said Wednesday that the prospect of a quick vote on a motion to dismiss any articles of impeachment against Trump seems unlikely.

“I certainly think we need to hear it out from the House. This is a serious thing. You’re considering removing somebody from office or impeaching them in that way. I think you got to hear it,” she said.

A Republican senator who requested anonymity to comment on internal party discussions said GOP colleagues are taking the possibility of an impeachment trial seriously as the Democratic-controlled House compiles more evidence.

“We’re all becoming much more aware of the process and that’s because of the situation we’re in with the House,” the senator said, who added of colleagues, “I don’t think they’re going to dismiss it.”

“Right now, based on the facts that we have currently, the president will have the support he needs to get through this,” the senator added, though the lawmaker said there are enough colleagues who feel they owe it to the public to give the articles of impeachment serious consideration.

McConnell on Tuesday declined to echo White House language calling the House impeachment probe “illegitimate and unconstitutional.”

Instead, he observed that “impeachment as a practical matter is whatever a majority of the House decides it is at any given moment.”

After Taylor’s damning testimony, Sen. John Thune (S.D.) admitted to reporters: “The picture coming out of it based on the reporting that we’ve seen is, yeah, I would say not a good one.”

On Wednesday, another blow against the president came when Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan, Trump’s nominee to serve as ambassador to Russia, testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that he was aware of an effort by Rudy Giuliani, Trump’s personal lawyer, to remove Marie Yovanovitch as the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine.

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, on Wednesday said it would be “inappropriate” if Giuliani or anyone else spread misinformation to remove a U.S. ambassador.

“I would be concerned if a U.S. ambassador anywhere in the world is the subject of a disinformation campaign directed from abroad or from any interest, for that matter,” he said, according to The Hill. “That would be something I wouldn’t be happy about. That would be something I would find to be inappropriate.”

Rubio also said it is important that he and his Senate colleagues carefully weigh the facts compiled by the House investigation.

“It’s important for us to make decisions based on all of the facts taken in context and taken together,” said Rubio, who noted that all of the facts and evidence compiled by House investigators have yet to be shared with the Senate.

It’s a more measured tone than Republicans used when the House was considering impeachment proceedings based on former special counsel Robert Mueller’s lengthy investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia in the 2016 presidential election and subsequent attempts to obstruct his investigation.

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